United States Institute of Peace USIP

Linked with David R. Smock – USA, and with When Religion Brings Peace, Not War.

The United States Institute of Peace is an independent, nonpartisan, national institution established and funded by Congress. Its goals are to help prevent and resolve violent conflicts, promote post-conflict stability and development, and increase peacebuilding capacity, tools, and intellectual capital worldwide. The Institute does this by empowering others with knowledge, skills, and resources, as well as by directly engaging in peacebuilding efforts around the globe. (updated December 1, 2007).

Learn more about USIP in this video;

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Conflict Analysis and Prevention;
Mediation and Conflict Resolution;
Post-Conflict Peace and Stability Operations;
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Address: United States Institute of Peace, 1200 17th Street NW, Washington, DC 20036, phone +1.202.457.1700, Fax +1.202.429.6063,
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About/FAQs: What is the U.S. Institute of Peace? The United States Institute of Peace is an independent nonpartisan national institution established and funded by Congress. Our mission is to help prevent, manage, and resolve violent international conflicts by empowering others with knowledge, skills, and resources, as well as by directly engaging in peacebuilding efforts around the world.

Established in 1984, USIP fulfills it mission through a unique combination of nonpartisan research, innovative program development, and hands-on support. Specifically, we:

  • Provide on-the-ground operational support in zones of conflict around the world;
  • Perform cutting edge research on the dynamics of conflict and on policy-and-practitioner-relevant subjects;
  • Identify best practices and develop innovative programs focused on the prevention, management, and resolution of violent conflict, and on the stabilization and transformation of societies emerging from conflict;
  • Provide professional/practitioner training on conflict management and negotiating techniques to government and military personnel, civil society leaders, and the staff of non-governmental and international organizations;
  • Educate emerging generations about conflict management by strengthening related secondary school, college, and university curricula, and by building the capabilities of future practitioners to make peace;
  • Support policymakers in the administration and Congress, as well as in the international community, by providing analyses, policy options, and advice; Inform academia, the media, and the public about the nature of current international and intrastate conflicts and on approaches to their prevention, management, and resolution, through a wide range of materials, publications, and events.

Who does the above work? … (full text).

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