Ask ERIC

the educator’s Reference Desk – the largest collection of education materials available online, created by the Information Institute of Syracuse – Linked today on our blogs with Education Resources Information Center ERIC, and with National Education Association NEA.

Welcome: The Educator’s Reference Desk builds on over a quarter century of experience providing high-quality resources and services to the education community. From the Information Institute of Syracuse, the people who created AskERIC, the Gateway to Educational Materials, and the Virtual Reference Desk, the Educator’s Reference Desk brings you the resources you have come to depend on. 2,000+ lesson plans, 3,000+ links to online education information, and 200+ question archive responses. (Homepage /Resource Guides).

Sitemap;
TOPICS A-Z; Lessons Plans; Question Archives;
Contact: c/o Information Institute of Syracuse.

Search GEM/ERIC: Looking for more educational resources? The Gateway to Educational Materials (GEM) provides quick and easy access to over 40,000 educational resources found on various federal, state, university, non-profit and commercial Internet sites.

Enter a word or words that describe the information you are looking for in the search box at right or visit the GEM website at The Gateway.org.

Looking for ERIC on the Educator’s Reference Desk?

In 1993, the Information Institute of Syracuse, operators of the widely acclaimed AskERIC service, was first in the world to place a search interface to ERIC on the Internet. Searching ERIC on the AskERIC website quickly became one of the most popular ways for educators and researchers to search for educational information. When the United States Department of Education closed all ERIC Clearinghouses and AskERIC on December 31, 2003 and started to reorganize ERIC, the Information Institute of Syracuse moved its familiar ERIC search engine to the Educator’s Reference Desk as a service to our loyal friends.

Our search engine pointed users to the Educational Document Reproduction Service (EDRS) and to e-subscribe for microfiche, paper or electronic copies of the documents abstracted in ERIC. On September 30, 2004, EDRS was closed by the United States Department of Education. This rendered our search interface a less complete option for searching and obtaining ERIC material.

The United States Department of Education operates an ERIC database containing more than one million records going back to 1966. More than 100,000 non-journal documents (issued 1993-2004), are available in full-text at no cost.

Educator’s Reference Desk users may wish to search ERIC* at the U.S. Department of Education’s ERIC website:
( * see also this here: The Educators Reference Desk is not affiliated with or funded by the ERIC program or the United States Department of Education. All questions concerning ERIC should be addressed directly to the ERIC program at 1-800-LET-ERIC).

Links:

Information Institute of Syracuse
;

The Virtual Reference Desk;

Gateway.org;

U.S. Department of Education;

National Center for Education Statistics.

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