All Afghan Women Union AAWU

Linked with Suraya Parlika – Afghanistan, and with the Afghan Women’s Organisation AWO.

This Group has not an own website, but is mentionned on the following sites:

Sonoma County Women’s Council: The Core Council of Women for a Better World, the SCWC has been active since the Spring of 2002 as a concerned group of women in the County addressing the cessation of war and establishment of women’s power and place in creating a peaceful world. To that end, they have connected with two organizations: the All Afghan Women’s Union, in particular the Kabul Peace Circle, a part of AAWU, and Afghans4Tomorrow, an American-Afghan group based in the East Bay, working to promote the re-building of Afghanistan. The Women’s Council linked up with the Kabul Peace Circle through PeaceXpeace, an international women’s online organization begun by Patricia Melton Smith. The WCSC was the first circle of women to link with another international one through PeaceXpeace (http://www.peacexpeace.org) Communication is difficult because of the language barrier as well as a lack of computer/email connection in Kabul, but the Council continues its work through personal visits. (full text).

Afghanistan: The ILO is working closely with other UN and International agencies in reconstruction activities in Afghanistan since 2003. More specifically the ILO Liaison Office in Kabul is providing support in building the capacity of ILO’s tripartite constituents e.g. restructuring the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (MoLSA), strengthening workers’ and employers’ organizations, providing employment services to the job seekers in 10 provinces; advisory services to build/strengthen the capacity of the MoLSA and on return, reintegration and temporary migration of Afghan workers and their protection; and technical advisory services to the government on skills development and market linkages programme (NSDP) through 3 technical cooperation projects funded by German Government, UNHCR and Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund. Ongoing Technical coopertion projects in Afghanistan: (full text).

Welcome to a little help, a charitable organization (IRS 501c3) working to improve the lives of women and girls around the world. We are currently working on grassroots efforts to help women impacted by the continuing instability in Afghanistan. Our donation recipients so far have included schools, clinics, maternity wards, vocational classes including the Kabul Beauty School and the Kabul Welayat (women’s prison). The programs page provides detailed program and financial information on all these projects. What’s New? (full text).

Other activities: The Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR), in close partnership with All Afghan Women’s Union (AAWU), conducted a seminar on human rights for active members of AAWU from August 9 – 13, 2003 in Kabul. The seminar was the first concrete step of DIHR’s activities within the emerging civil society framework in Afghanistan. One of the objectives of the seminar was to help All Afghan Women Union in preparing reports. DIHR also learnt from AAWU’s experience in the sphere of women rights and gender equality in the country. DIHR’s team also met several civil society organizations, representatives of international organizations based in Kabul, national and international media and Afghan official authorities in preparation of a programme in support of civil society and human rights in Afghanistan. A wide variety of domestic and international human rights groups operate without government restriction. They investigate and publish their findings on human rights cases. Some of them are based in neighbouring countries, mostly Pakistan, with branches inside Afghanistan; others are only based in the country. Presently the focus of their activities is primarily humanitarian assistance, rehabilitation, health, education, and agriculture. However, the lack of security and instability in the North and Southeast severely affect the NGO activities in these areas. (full text).

The All Afghan Women’s Union AAWU was formed to oppose the flood of oppression and violence that surround women’s lives. Especially during the “dark regime of the Taliban,” when the doors of schools, colleges and offices were closed against women and girls, she and her brave companions risked beatings, jail and death to teach them English courses, computer skills and handicrafts in secret in their homes … In addition to being a Loya Jirga delegate, Suraya is the leader of the All Afghan Women’s Union (AAWU), formed to oppose the flood of oppression and violence that surround women’s lives. Especially during the “dark regime of the Taliban,” when the doors of schools, colleges and offices were closed against women and girls, she and her brave companions risked beatings, jail and death to teach them English courses, computer skills and handicrafts in secret in their homes. In 1978, after earning a Masters in Economics she was elected chairman of the Democratic Organization of Afghan Women. The price of her leadership was torture and imprisonment in Pul-e-Charkhi prison. She was unbowed. On December 27, 1979 she was released from prison and again accepted the chairmanship of the Democratic Organization of Afghan Women, where she continued until 1986. At this point Suraya became head of the Afghan Red Crescent, a post she held until she was fired in 1992, when the mujahedin entered Kabul and ousted the Najibullah regime. She has been imprisoned, attacked, and shot, but vows to keep fighting. “I will continue my activities until Afghanistan has democracy, peace, equality between women and men, social development and the involvement of women in political, economic and social affairs.” (full text).

Afghanistan, often called the crossroads of Central Asia, is a livestock and agriculturally-based country devastated by decades of war, poverty, and oppressive political rule. Impacted by a long history of invasions or control by foreign powers, the country’s economic, political and social structures have been characterized by instability and turbulence. Many years of war and political volatility have fostered conditions that make Afghanistan one of the world’s poorest countries. The country had its first democratic elections in September 2004 and continues to undergo a massive internationally-supported reconstruction effort that includes strengthening of central government and public institutions. Regional militias and sporadic violence by extremist groups continue to pose one of the greatest threats to Afghanistan’s stability. (full text).

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